There are currently (approximately) 119 million official practitioners of Shinto in Japan, although a person who practices any manner of Shinto rituals may be so counted. Through strong spiritual connection some Americans, Canadians, Italians, etc. have formed with the Kamisama, the ancient way of Japan has spread to many other parts of the world.
In the 2006 Australian Census, 0.01% (1,305) of people from Australia had specified Japanese Religions as their primary belief.
The numbers are significantly up on the previous Census indicating that there has been growth in Shinto. Below is the statistical break up by State:
Australian Capital Territory
· 109
In the 2006 Australian Census, 0.03% of people from Australian Capital Territory had specified Japanese Religions as their primary belief.
Victoria
· 251
In the 2006 Australian Census, 0.01% of people from Victoria had specified Japanese Religions as their primary belief.
Northern Territory
· 10
In the 2006 Australian Census, 0.01% of people from Northern Territory had specified Japanese Religions as their primary belief.
Queensland
· 248
In the 2006 Australian Census, 0.01% of people from Queensland had specified Japanese Religions as their primary belief.
South Australia
· 84
In the 2006 Australian Census, 0.01% of people from South Australia had specified Japanese Religions as their primary belief.
Western Australia
· 113
In the 2006 Australian Census, 0.01% of people from Western Australia had specified Japanese Religions as their primary belief.
New South Wales
· 445
In the 2006 Australian Census, 0.01% of people from New South Wales had specified Japanese Religions as their primary belief.
Tasmania
· 55
In the 2006 Australian Census, 0.01% of people from Tasmania had specified Japanese Religions as their primary belief.
It’s therefore true to say that whilst there is evidence of Shinto being practiced outside of Japan, the majority of people practicing this world religion are based in the country of origin. japanese-wedding-shinto-ceremony-t8965.jpg